God through His Word in Jude prophesied that people will try to change or twist the meaning of the word GRACE.

Jude 3 "Beloved,when I gave all diligence to write unto you of our common salvation(grace),it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints."

Jude 4 "For there are certain men crept in unawares, who were before of old, ordained to these condemnation, ungodly men,turning the grace of God into lasciviousness, and denying the only Lord God, and our Lord Jesus Christ."

Jude's original intent was because of false preachers teaching a perverted Gospel and to remind them to be contended with the Gospel that was delivered to them by the apostles. These false church pastors are turning God's grace into an excuse out of following God's law.Remember sin according to 1 John 3:4 is the transgression of God's law.

Ephesians 2:8 "For by grace are ye saved through faith: and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God."

Now these false and deceptive preachers teaches that grace means saved. Yes we are saved by grace but it doesn't mean saved.
The word grace means forgiveness, mercy,or unmerited pardon. It also mean benefit, favour or gift.Grace is a free gift from God.

"For the wages of sin is death:but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our our Lord." Roman 6:23.

We for sinning or transgressing God's law were allocated the eternal death penalty. Jesus Christ died for this purpose for His shed blood erased this eternal death penalty for our past sins.

"Much more then,being now justified by His blood ,we shall be saved from wrath through Him." Roman 5:9

"In Christ we have redemption through His blood,the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of His grace." Ephesians 1:7.

Grace is defined above as God's willingness to forgive us of our past sins.Not His willingness to change or abolish His Law.

Since sin is the breaking of God's law, we all going to suffer eternal death. Christ then came in to pay the death penalty.Christ died instead of us for breaking God's law.Jesus if you still haven't grasp it paid the penalty according to the law.It is the penalty of the law. Christ death even shows that the law stands.
Jesus Himself said in Matthew 5:18, "Till heaven and earth pass,one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law,till all be fulfilled."
"..I have not come to abolish the law but to fulfill them." Matthew 5:17

While grace is a free gift, it is also conditional.God requires certain things of us before we receive it. Jesus stressed that unless we repent, we shall all perish in Luke 13:3.

Now repent is to turn away from sin and dedicate oneself to the amendment of one's life; to feel regret, to change one's mind according to Websters.
Acts 3:9 says,"Repent ye therefore and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out..."
The above verse clearly shows that you have to be converted before you can receive grace.

Acts 2:38 says," Repent and be baptised every one of you in the name of Christ, for the remission of sins,and ye shall receive the gifts of the Holy Spirit."
After being converted we are then baptised which symbolises the washing away away of our past sins and God will impart His Holy Spirit into us which is the power we need to live according to the spirit.
This repentance is different from what we hear today in most churches.Most preaches just to be sorry and repeat a simple word of prayer from the preacher. The Holy Spirit will only dwell in those who continues without sins.

Paul wrote in Romans 5:21, "That as sin hath reigned unto death even so might grace reign through righteousness (obedience to God's law) unto eternal life by Jesus Christ our Lord."
Because of Christ's blood we are under grace.

Read the very next verse.Romans 6:1 "What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound?"
Not even traditional Christianity will preach we continue in sin but yet they all insist on discontinuing the law.
John writing 60 years after Christ rose from the dead said in 1 John 3:4 that sin is the transgression of God's law.

Paul continues in verse 2 of Romans 6,"God forbids.How shall we that are dead to sin ,live any longer."
He is saying we will suffer eternal death again if we sin.Again under the law.Remember when we are converted and baptised we are under grace and eternal life.

Then Paul goes on to describe in verse 3&4 how we are symbolically buried with Christ. When we come out of the water, we walk with Christ in newness of life.

In verse 11 he says,"Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin,but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord."

Verse 12, "Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body that you should obey it in the lusts thereof."
The storyflow here is after we repent, we are baptised, and received the Holy Spirit. We ought not to let sin continue in our bodies. Our newness of life means we overcomes sin by yielding ourselves to God according to verse 13.

Now we come to verse 14.This is one of the most misunderstood verse in the Bible.Hailed as a key verse in the abolishment of the law by false preachers.

" FOR SIN SHALL NOT HAVE DOMINION OVER YOU FOR YOU ARE NOT UNDER THE LAW,BUT UNDER GRACE."
Now for a traditional Christian that is just enough said.Full stop.We live under grace and the law is supposedly abolilished here.
But look closely at the storyflow from chapter 5 right through to chapter 6 and it will show otherwise.

Keeping in mind that sin is the transgression of God's law which also brings with it the death penalty. We came under the law when we transgreseth against it.The penalty of the law is death. But if we repent and be converted through the Holy Spirit,we are not under the penalty of the law but under grace because of Christ's sacrifice.
Paul knows people will misinterpret his words after saying we are not under the law but under grace so he says in verse 15 that God forbids us to sin anymore.

God's merciful grace does not give us the right to live contrary to His law,the Ten Commandments.
According to Galatians 2:21,Christ would have died in vain if we think we can save ourselves by our own work.But also remember that according to Jude 4, if we think that Christ did everything for us and that we can continue to sin against the law because of grace, Christ would also have died in vain.

Jesus Christ Himself said in Matthew 19:17,"If thou wilt enter enter into life, keep thou the commandments."

Paul not only called the law holy and good in Romans 7:12,he also said that "I myself serve the law in verse 25.

James 2:8-10, that if you offend the law in one point you are guilty of all.

John said if we said we know God but do not keep the commandments WE ARE LIARS (1 John 2:3-4).

Above are some New Testament for those who rejects the Old Testament which were written years after Christ rose from the dead.

Now let us be honest with ourselves as God would not allow the violation of His law because of grace.
It was the violation of God's law which makes it a must for Christ to die.To pay the death penalty of the law.

Living under grace means living according to God's Spirit in humble obedience to His Laws.

May God helps us to understand so that His grace will be upon us.

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Satan vigorously attacked the church that Jesus founded after His death in 31 A.D.
In fact there is no recorded history of the church from 70 A.D to 170 A.D.
Simon Magus the sorcerer led this suppression of God's church from 31 A.D. He was the same man mentioned in Acts 8. He is also known as Simon the pater, Simon the magician and also as the papa(pope) or the father.

This man sets himself up as a god and married pagan rites into a counterfeit religion that appropriated Christ's name into it which later emerged out of history in 170 A.D.

This Christianity that emerged and later spread out into all the world was very different from the one that Jesus started.It is as different as black and white or as the day from night.
Nearly all of today's today's church denomination later branched out of this religion. It has a different gospel, a different sabbath,different holy days from those that the apostles and Jesus observed. And certainly it corrupted biblical teachings and through Satan deceived the people throughout the ages.

Just before this age or end times come to an end the whole world would have been deceived. See Revelation 12:9.

And yes it taught that the law was abolished by Christ's death.Yet we see in the New Testament incidences where Jesus and the apostles observed the law or God's Ten Commandments.

This Christianity taught that we can break God's law by teaching people a counterfeit grace whereas grace according to the Bible is living in obedience to God's holy laws.

 

1 Timothy 1:8-11
8 But we know that the law is good, if a man use it lawfully; 9 Knowing this, that the law is not made for a righteous man, but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and for sinners, for unholy and profane, for murderers of fathers and murderers of mothers, for manslayers, 10 For whoremongers, for them that defile themselves with mankind, for menstealers, for liars, for perjured persons, and if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine; 11 According to the glorious gospel of the blessed God, which was committed to my trust. (KJV)

 

 

1:8 The proper function of the law is to make sinners aware of their sinfulness (see Rom. 3:20).

1:9 Paul’s list of those who have violated the law appears to parallel the order of the Ten Commandments (see Ex. 20:3–17). The first three pairs of violations recall the first four commands, which address a person’s relationship with God: the lawless and insubordinate, the ungodly and . . . sinners, and the unholy and profane. Following these are eight violations that parallel five of the last six commands of the Ten Commandments. Covetousness is not mentioned.

1:10 Fornicators are persons involved in sexual immorality in general. Sodomites are specifically male homosexuals (see 1 Cor. 6:9). But heterosexual and homosexual immorality are violations of the seventh commandment. kidnappers . . . liars . . . perjurers: These are violations of commandments eight and nine. Sound doctrine may also be translated “healthy teaching.” Sound is derived from the Greek for “in good health.” Doctrine is a key theme in 1 Timothy (see also 4:1, 6, 13, 16; 5:17; 6:1).

1:11 according to the glorious gospel: This phrase should be interpreted in its immediate context, a discussion about the purpose of the law. The proper use of the law is to demonstrate human sinfulness and need our for the Good News that Christ has saved us from bondage to the law and our own sins.[1]

 

 

 

 



[1]Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (1997). The Nelson study Bible : New King James Version. Includes index. (1 Ti 1:8). Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers.

 

1:8 Paul makes it abundantly clear that there is nothing the matter with the law. “Therefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy and just and good” (Rom. 7:12). But the law must be used lawfully. It was never given as a means of salvation (Acts 13:39; Rom. 3:20; .Gal 2:16, 21; 3:11). The lawful use of the law is to so employ it in preaching and teaching as to produce conviction of sin. It should not be presented as a means of salvation or as a rule of life.

Guy King has pointed out that the three lessons which the law teaches are: “We ought. We haven’t. We can’t.” When the law has done its work in the life of a sinner, then that person is ready to cry out to God, “Lord, save me by Your grace!” 2 Those who teach that the law is essential for salvation or sanctification are not consistent. They say that if a Christian breaks the law, then he need not be put to death. This is not establishing the authority of the law. Law without penalty is nothing but good advice.

1:9 The law is not made for a righteous person. If a man is righteous, he does not need a law. That is true of the Christian. When he is saved by the grace of God, he does not need to be placed under the Ten Commandments in order for him to live a holy life. It is not fear of punishment that makes a Christian live in a godly manner, but rather love for the Savior who died at Calvary.

The apostle goes on to describe the type of people for whom the law was given. Many Bible commentators have pointed out that there is a close connection between this description and the Ten Commandments themselves. The Ten Commandments are divided into two sections: the first four have to do with man’s duty toward God (godliness), whereas the remaining six have to do with his duty toward his neighbor (righteousness). The following words seem to correspond to the first section of the Ten Commandments: For the lawless and insubordinate, for the ungodly and for sinners, for the unholy and profane. ... The expression for man slayers is linked with the sixth commandment: You shall not murder. Here manslayers refers to murderers, and not just to a person who kills another accidentally.

1:10 The words for fornicators, for sodomites describe immoral heterosexuals and homosexuals. Here they are linked to the seventh commandment: “You shall not commit adultery.” The phrase for kidnappers is obviously related to the eighth commandment: “You shall not steal.” For liars, for perjurers (or false swearers) connects with the ninth commandment: “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.”

The final words and if there is any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine are not directly related to the tenth commandment, but rather seem to sweep back over all the commandments and summarize them.

1:11 It is difficult to decide how this verse is connected with what has gone before. It may mean that the sound doctrine mentioned in verse 10 is according to the ... gospel. Or it may mean that all that Paul has been saying about the law in verses 8–10 is in perfect agreement with the gospel which he preach ed. Or again, it may mean that all that Paul has been saying about false teachers in verses 3–10 is in accord with the gospel message. While it is true that the gospel is glorious, the emphasis here may be on the fact that the gospel tells of the glory (the literal translation of glorious) of God in a wonderful way. It tells how the same God who is holy, righteous, and just is at the same time a God of grace, mercy, and love. His love provided what His holiness demanded; now those who receive the Lord Jesus are given eternal life.

This is the gospel ... which was committed to the apostle’s trust. It centers around the glorified Lord Jesus Christ and tells men that He is not only Savior but Lord as well.[1]

 

 
 


2 (1:8) Guy King, A Leader Led, p. 25.

[1]MacDonald, W., & Farstad, A. (1997, c1995). Believer's Bible Commentary : Old and New Testaments (1 Ti 1:8). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

7–8. Teachers of the law. The law is good and meant to be used even today, but it must be used for its intended purpose, i.e., “that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God” (Rom 3:19), so that man turns toward Christ for righteousness (Rom 10:1–4; Gal 2:21; 3:24–25).

9–11. A righteous man,a saved person” is not under the law but grace. He is not lawless but the controlling force is the Holy Spirit and the grace of God (Gal 3:1–5; Tit 2:11ff.). The list of sins parallels the Ten Commandments which condemn each sin and bring guilt. Sound doctrine can be judged by whether it is a “gospel of the glory of the blessed God,” which is the sense here. People are transformed in the church by “be holding … the glory of the Lord” (II Cor 3:18) and not a constant bombardment of legalistic preaching or teaching. Paul felt keenly this ministry was a trust.[1]

 

 

 



[1]KJV Bible commentary. 1997, c1994 (2495). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

1 Timothy 1:8-11
8 But we know that the law is good, if a man use it lawfully; 9 Knowing this, that the law is not made for a righteous man, but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and for sinners, for unholy and profane, for murderers of fathers and murderers of mothers, for manslayers, 10 For whoremongers, for them that defile themselves with mankind, for menstealers, for liars, for perjured persons, and if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine; 11 According to the glorious gospel of the blessed God, which was committed to my trust. (KJV)

 

 

1:8–11 Even something good like the law can be used improperly. Its purpose is to teach us about right and wrong and to curb sinners. It is not given to bring those who are righteous through Christ into legalistic bondage (Rom. 7:12, 13). The sins listed in vv. 9, 10 are flagrant violations of the Ten Commandments.

1:8 The proper function of the law is to make sinners aware of their sinfulness (Rom. 3:20).

1:9 Paul’s list of those who have violated the law appears to parallel the order of the Ten Commandments (Ex. 20:3–17). The first three pairs of violations recall the first four commands, which address a person’s relationship with God: the lawless and insubordinate, the ungodly and … sinners, and the unholy and profane. Following these are eight violations that parallel five of the last six commands of the Ten Commandments. Covetousness is not mentioned.

1:10 Fornicators are persons involved in sexual immorality in general. Sodomites are specifically male homosexuals (1 Cor. 6:9). But heterosexual and homosexual immorality are violations of the seventh commandment. kidnappers … liars … perjurers: These are violations of commandments eight and nine. Sound doctrine may also be translated “healthy teaching.” Sound is derived from the Greek for “in good health.” Doctrine is a key theme in 1 Timothy (4:1, 6, 13, 16; 5:17; 6:1).

1:11 according to the glorious gospel: This phrase should be interpreted in its immediate context, a discussion about the purpose of the law. The proper use of the law is to demonstrate human sinfulness and our need for the Good News that Christ has saved us from bondage to the law and our own sins.[1]

 

 
 


[1]Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (1999). Nelson's new illustrated Bible commentary (1 Ti 1:8-11). Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers.

Mr Joe even though your cut and paste piece above showed that
1 Timothy 1:8-11 means that the Ten Commandments stands and was not abolished,but still you would not admit it.
It is okay the Bible says you cannot.Sad.

Romans 8:7-8 NIV
7 the sinful mind is hostile to God. It does not submit to God's law, nor can it do so. 8 Those controlled by the sinful nature cannot please God.

Ulaya please understand the purpose of the Ten Commandments and the LAW. It is meant to save anyone but to point every one to the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation. After salvation you don't the LAW.

 

GRACE is our guide to holy living through the direction of the Holy Spirit.

 

The only reason you're still promoting the LAW is because you're not saved and reject Jesus Christ's offer of salvation.

 

 

The LAW condemns you BUT has no POWER to SAVE you

 

 

1 Corinthians 15:56-57
56 For sin is the sting that results in death, and the law gives sin its power. 57 But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ. (NLT)

 

1 Corinthians 15:56-57
56 The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. 57 But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. (KJV)

 

 

Spiritual Application:

15:56 Death would have no sting for anyone if it were not for sin. It is the consciousness of sins unconfessed and unforgiven that makes men afraid to die. If we know our sins are forgiven, we can face death with confidence. If, on the other hand, sin is on the conscience, death is terrible—the beginning of eternal punishment.

The strength of sin is the law, that is, the law condemns the sinner. It pronounces the doom of all who have failed to obey God’s holy precepts. It has been well said that if there were no sin, there would be no death. And if there were no law, there would be no condemnation.

The throne of death rests on two bases: sin, which calls for condemnation, and the law which pronounces it. Consequently, it is on these two powers that the work of the Deliverer bore. 57

15:57 Through faith in Him, we have victory over death and the grave. Death is robbed of its sting. It is a known fact that when certain insects sting a person, they leave their stinger imbedded in the person’s flesh, and being thus robbed of their “sting,” they die. In a very real sense death stung itself to death at the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, and now the King of Terrors is robbed of his terror as far as the believer is concerned. [1]

 



57 (15:56) Godet, First Corinthians, p. 446.

[1]MacDonald, W., & Farstad, A. (1997, c1995). Believer's Bible Commentary : Old and New Testaments (1 Co 15:56). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

 

 

 

GRACE

 

Grace is the gift of God by which he extends mercy, loving-kindness, and salvation to people. God's grace enables him to confront human indifference and rebellion with his unlimited capacity to forgive and to bless. God is gracious in action. The doctrine of divine grace underlies the thought of both the Old Testament and New Testament. However, the Old Testament merely anticipates and prepares for the full expression of grace that is revealed in the New Testament.

 

GRACE IN THE OLD TESTAMENT

Early in the narrative of the Old Testament, God reveals himself as a "God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness" (Exodus 34:6, RSV). As a result, it becomes possible for undeserving humans to approach him with the prayer, "If now I have found favour [or grace] in thy sight, O Lord ..." (Exodus 34:9, RSV). Through his grace, God transforms our separation from him into a state of undeserved acceptance that opens the way for reconciliation and redemption.

 

Divine grace was already at work in the Garden of Eden when God responded to the Fall of his Creation with the promise of redemption (Genesis 3:15) and care rather than with abandonment or destruction. God's call to Abraham was an extension of grace to him. The blessings God offered to Abraham's descendants would be instrumental in bringing about a universal blessing to "all the families of the earth" (Genesis 12:2-3). This blessing finds expression in a God-given covenant, the object of which is to extend God's grace to the whole human race. In a solemn confirmation of the promise to Abraham, God affirmed, "My covenant is with you, and you shall be the father of a multitude of nations. . . . And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your descendants after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant" (Genesis 17:4, 7, RSV). Because of grace, this promise was applicable to all Abraham's offspring-not only to his racial descendants, the Jews, but also to his spiritual descendants, believers from all nations (Romans 4:16). It was God's plan for redeeming all believers, from all nations. In extending his grace to Abraham, God was establishing the beginnings of the church, the community of grace.

 

The specific blessing of Abraham and his receiving of God's grace provides a model for the selection of individuals used by God in the history of redemption. In the gracious dealings of God with Israel, God was laying the basis for his outreach of grace to the universal church. God's gracious interventions in the old covenant (before Jesus) were intended to reveal the role of the church in his plan for redeeming the world. The prophets of the old covenant were not merely serving themselves, or their contemporaries, but the church (1 Peter 1:10-12).

The institutions of the old covenant held only a temporary form of God's grace. The ultimate expression of that grace came in the new covenant when Jesus accomplished his work (Hebrews 8:6-7). Consequently, the old covenant became obsolete and was replaced by a new covenant that displayed the full manifestation of God's grace. The tension between law and grace is obvious from this perspective. Like the election of the nation of Israel, the law was a temporary measure that prepared for the grace that was to come by faith in Jesus Christ (Galatians 3:23-29; Hebrews 10:1).

 

GRACE IN THE NEW TESTAMENT

The concept of grace (God's active involvement on behalf of his people) receives a sharper focus in the New Testament. Divine grace becomes embodied in the person of Jesus Christ. Jesus demonstrates visibly the dynamic nature of God's grace, and his ministry fulfills the promises of grace for everyone, found in the old covenant (John 1:14, 17).

 

God's grace revealed in Jesus Christ makes it possible for God to forgive sin and to gather sinners into the church, the new covenant community. During his ministry, Jesus repeatedly pronounced the words of forgiveness to a great number of sinners and ministered to a variety of desperate human needs. Through teachings such as the prodigal son and the search for the lost sheep, Jesus made it clear that he had come to seek and save those who were lost. Ultimately it was his death on the cross that enabled sinners who repent to access God's forgiving and restorative grace. This simple truth is described as the doctrine of justification by faith through grace (Romans 3:23). According to this teaching, Jesus substituted himself for us by dying so that we could be declared "not guilty." As a result, repentant believers enter into God's eternal plan of grace, which enables them to participate in the purifying work of the Spirit of God.

 

God's grace bestows on believers undeserved benefits that enrich their lives and unite them together in the church, the body of Christ. Grace awards them a new status as children of God, members of the household of God, so that they relate to him as to their heavenly Father (Galatians 4:4-6). Because of this, they become members of a community where race, class, and gender distinctions are irrelevant. All have become equal inheritors of God's long-ago promise to Abraham (Galatians 3:28-29). The Holy Spirit then graciously energizes believers with a variety of spiritual gifts that benefit the body of Christ, the church (Romans 12:6-8). In eternity the church will demonstrate, by its very existence, the immeasurable riches of God's grace in Jesus Christ (Ephesians 2:6).

 

Finally, God's grace manifested in Jesus Christ makes it possible for God to cause believers to reflect his grace in their character and relationships. The condition for receiving God's grace is humility (James 4:6; 1 Peter 5:5). Such humility before God enables believers to practice humility with other people. From a position of grace, they can set aside selfishness and conceit in order to treat others with an attitude of servanthood (Ephesians 5:21), and in a spirit of forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35), so that even their communication can demonstrate divine grace (Colossians 4:6).

The essential meaning of grace in the Bible refers to the nature of God's character to exercise goodwill toward his creatures. This nature finds its supreme expression in Jesus Christ. By its very definition, this grace is fully accessible to all humans with no other condition than a desire to repent and receive it (Titus 2:11-12). As a result, alienation from God becomes access to his otherwise unapproachable majesty. His grace becomes available to meet human need (Hebrews 4:16). The tragic alternative to receiving God's grace is to remain in hopeless alienation or to pursue futile attempts to earn God's favour (Romans 1:21).

 

Christ represents the fulfillment, the embodiment, and the dispenser of divine grace. In fact, the early Christians freely referred to God's grace as "the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ." This grace was conceived as being so basic to their existence that they combined the traditional greeting of shalom ("peace") with a reference to the grace of Jesus Christ. This is the reason for the basic greeting formula found in almost every book of the New Testament, "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all" (2 Thessalonians 3:18).

 

 

Sourced from: iLumina Encyclopaedia  

James 2:14-26New King James Version (NKJV)

Faith Without Works Is Dead
14 What does it profit, my brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can faith save him? 15 If a brother or sister is naked and destitute of daily food, 16 and one of you says to them, “Depart in peace, be warmed and filled,” but you do not give them the things which are needed for the body, what does it profit? 17 Thus also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.

18 But someone will say, “You have faith, and I have works.” Show me your faith without your[a] works, and I will show you my faith by my[b] works. 19 You believe that there is one God. You do well. Even the demons believe—and tremble! 20 But do you want to know, O foolish man, that faith without works is dead?[c] 21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered Isaac his son on the altar? 22 Do you see that faith was working together with his works, and by works faith was made perfect? 23 And the Scripture was fulfilled which says, “Abraham believed God, and it was accounted to him for righteousness.”[d] And he was called the friend of God. 24 You see then that a man is justified by works, and not by faith only.

25 Likewise, was not Rahab the harlot also justified by works when she received the messengers and sent them out another way?

26 For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.


Happy new year everyone.

 

James 2:14-26
14 What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save him? 15 If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, 16 And one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit? 17 Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. 18 Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works. 19 Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble. 20 But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead? 21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar? 22 Seest thou how faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect? 23 And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God. 24 Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only. 25 Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way? 26 For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. (KJV)

 

 

14. If one regards the author’s purpose, the discussion will be less difficult to interpret. Many misunderstand this verse because they fail to observe two significant facts. First, James does not state that the hypothetical person “has” faith, but merely a man say he hath faith. It distinguishes the one who “possesses” from the one who merely “professes.” Secondly, conclusions are based on the question, can faith save him? The AV unfortunately gives a wrong impression, for he is not asking about faith in general, but that type of faith which one has who makes claims without producing fruit. This is affirmed by the presence of the definite article in Greek meaning “the faith.” “Can that faith save him?” would be a proper translation. Which faith? That which the man claims to have. That being the case, James does not contradict Paul. Both affirm that true saving faith results in a changed life as evidenced by works (Eph 2:8–10).

15–16. When Christians say empty platitudes without actually helping those in physical need, what doth it profit? How many words fill a hungry stomach?

17. Even so. As the worthlessness of well-wishers reveal their selfishness, so barrenness in a professing believer’s life exposes his insincerity. Significantly, the Greek text states with the article, that “the faith … is dead, being alone. James refers specifically to the faith which is claimed, not the genuine brand.”

18. A man may say. The author communicates his accusation through an assumed third person, allowing his remarks to be received more objectively. The matter of contention is not works per se, but the evidence of faith. Pious expressions may seem to be religious (1:26), but actions are what people hear.

19. One fixed tenet of these Jewish readers was monotheism, Thou believest that there is one God; but doctrine alone does not save. Thou doest well inserts a measure of sarcasm, for he quickly points out that the devils (Gr daimonion, “demons”) also affirm that truth. Demonic faith, far from effecting service, exists in terror.

20. Wilt thou know is rhetorical. Having developed his argument to this point, James expects the recognition of truth. The address, O vain man, extends beyond empty faith to a person void of reality. As in verse 17, the word faith occurs with the Greek definite article meaning “the faith” or “that faith.”

21. Abraham is the father of all believers (Rom 4:16), but the reference here, our father, links him with his nation, the Jews. That he was justified by works appears to contradict Paul’s “justification by faith” (Rom 3:28; 4:2; 5:1). Romans 3:20 conclusively declares, “Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight.” Observe Paul’s references to God: “in His sight” plus “before God” in Romans 4:2 (cf. Thomas Manton, An Exposition of the Epistle of James, p. 244). Most frequently, the word for justify (Gr dikaiooæ) in the New Testament speaks of God’s positive verdict, the opposite of condemnation. The unjustified man, according to Romans, is a condemned sinner; but in the Epistle of James he is a hypocrite. Consequently, Abraham’s justification in this passage consisted of man’s verdict. Christians, Jews, and Arabs have “declared righteous” this man of God, because of the faith demonstrated when he offered his only son.

22. A more accurate translation of faith wrought with his works would be “faith operated by means of his works.” Salvation is not accomplished through the cooperation of faith and works, but faith finds its channel of expression in works. By works was faith made perfect may be rendered “out of works was faith completed.” James 1:3–4 embraces the same thought: the development of inner character parallels the extent of testing endured (I Pet 1:7).

23. The author never impugns faith per se, but he candidly denounces that brand of self-acclaimed faith which finds no profitable service. Genesis 15:6 was spoken years before Isaac was offered, but it was then that Abraham’s faith became evident. His fame resulted from works, the corollary of real faith (Rom 4:19–22); but his relationship with the Lord had been settled years before. He has been called the Friend of God for centuries by Jews, Arabs, and Christians.

24. In a court, if a man’s motive comes in question, the only means to justify or vindicate his motive is to examine his acts. Genuine faith is conscious of others. “Pure religion” involves a life of ministry, not introspective qualities.

25. Rahab’s works were done by faith (Heb 11:31), but actions were necessary to affirm her inner change. Had she remained in sin while acclaiming faith, she would never have been “declared righteous” (justified).

26. The comparison of the human spirit and faith converges around their modes of operation. The spirit (Gr pneuma) may also be translated “breath.” As a breathless body emits no indication of life, so fruitless faith exhibits nothing more than hypocrisy.[1]

 

 
 


[1]KJV Bible commentary. 1997, c1994 (2589). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

Abraham was justified by faith even before Isaac was born. In the book of Genesis 15:5-6 it says Abraham believed the Lord and He accounted it to him for righteousness.

Rahab used the term "LORD" or YAHWEH and declared to the spies that He was supreme God of the heavens above and the earth below. She was already a believer in Yahweh.....that is why she was willing to help.

GRACE — favor or kindness shown without regard to the worth or merit of the one who receives it and in spite of what that person deserves. Grace is one of the key attributes of God. The Lord God is “merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abounding in goodness and truth” (Ex. 34:6). Therefore, grace is almost always associated with mercy, love, compassion, and patience.

In the Old Testament, the supreme example of grace was the redemption of the Hebrew people from Egypt and their establishment in the Promised Land. This did not happen because of any merit on Israel’s part, but in spite of their unrighteousness (Deut. 7:7–8; 9:5–6). Although the grace of God is always free and undeserved, it must not be taken for granted. Grace is only enjoyed within the Covenant—the gift is given by God, and the gift is received by people through repentance and faith (Amos 5:15). Grace is to be humbly sought through the prayer of faith (Mal. 1:9).

The grace of God was supremely revealed and given in the person and work of Jesus Christ. Jesus was not only the beneficiary of God’s grace (Luke 2:40), but was also its very embodiment (John 1:14), bringing it to humankind for salvation (Titus 2:11). By His death and resurrection, Jesus restored the broken fellowship between God and His people, both Jew and Gentile. The only way of salvation for any person is “through the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ” (Acts 15:11).

The grace of God revealed in Jesus Christ is applied to human beings for their salvation by the Holy Spirit, who is called “the Spirit of grace” (Heb. 10:29). The Spirit is the One who binds Christ to His people so that they receive forgiveness, adoption to sonship, and newness of life, as well as every spiritual gift or grace (Eph. 4:7).

The theme of grace is especially prominent in the letters of Paul. He sets grace radically over against the law and the works of the law (Rom. 3:24, 28). Paul makes it abundantly clear that salvation is not something that can be earned; it can be received only as a gift of grace (Rom. 4:4). Grace, however, must be accompanied by faith; a person must trust in the mercy and favor of God, even while it is undeserved (Rom. 4:16; Gal. 2:16).

The law of Moses revealed the righteous will of God in the midst of pagan darkness; it was God’s gracious gift to Israel (Deut. 4:8). But His will was made complete when Jesus brought the gospel of grace into the world (John 1:17).[1]

 

 

GRACE

1. charis (χάρις, 5485) has various uses, (a) objective, that which bestows or occasions pleasure, delight, or causes favorable regard; it is applied, e.g., to beauty, or gracefulness of person, Luke 2:40; act, 2 Cor. 8:6, or speech, Luke 4:22, rv, “words of grace” (kjv, “gracious words”); Col. 4:6; (b) subjective, (1) on the part of the bestower, the friendly disposition from which the kindly act proceeds, graciousness, loving-kindness, goodwill generally, e.g., Acts 7:10; especially with reference to the divine favor or “grace,” e.g., Acts 14:26; in this respect there is stress on its freeness and universality, its spontaneous character, as in the case of God’s redemptive mercy, and the pleasure or joy He designs for the recipient; thus it is set in contrast with debt, Rom. 4:4, 16, with works, 11:6, and with law, John 1:17; see also, e.g., Rom. 6:14, 15; Gal. 5:4; (2) on the part of the receiver, a sense of the favor bestowed, a feeling of gratitude, e.g., Rom. 6:17 (“thanks”); in this respect it sometimes signifies “to be thankful,” e.g., Luke 17:9 (“doth he thank the servant?” lit., “hath he thanks to”); 1 Tim. 1:12; (c) in another objective sense, the effect of “grace,” the spiritual state of those who have experienced its exercise, whether (1) a state of “grace,” e.g., Rom. 5:2; 1 Pet. 5:12; 2 Pet. 3:18, or (2) a proof thereof in practical effects, deeds of “grace,” e.g., 1 Cor. 16:3, rv, “bounty” (kjv, “liberality”); 2 Cor. 8:6, 19 (in 2 Cor. 9:8 it means the sum of earthly blessings); the power and equipment for ministry, e.g., Rom. 1:5; 12:6; 15:15; 1 Cor. 3:10; Gal. 2:9; Eph. 3:2, 7.

To be in favor with is to find “grace” with, e.g., Acts 2:47; hence it appears in this sense at the beginning and the end of several epistles, where the writer desires “grace” from God for the readers, e.g., Rom. 1:7; 1 Cor. 1:3; in this respect it is connected with the imperative mood of the word chairo, “to rejoice,” a mode of greeting among Greeks, e.g., Acts 15:23; Jas. 1:1 (marg.); 2 John 10, 11, rv, “greeting” (kjv, “God speed”).

The fact that “grace” is received both from God the Father, 2 Cor. 1:12, and from Christ, Gal. 1:6; Rom. 5:15 (where both are mentioned), is a testimony to the deity of Christ. See also 2 Thess. 1:12, where the phrase “according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ” is to be taken with each of the preceding clauses, “in you,” “and ye in Him.”

In Jas. 4:6, “But He giveth more grace” (Greek, “a greater grace,” rv, marg.), the statement is to be taken in connection with the preceding verse, which contains two remonstrating, rhetorical questions, “Think ye that the Scripture speaketh in vain?” and “Doth the Spirit (the Holy Spirit) which He made to dwell in us long unto envying?” (see the rv). The implied answer to each is “it cannot be so.” Accordingly, if those who are acting so flagrantly, as if it were so, will listen to the Scripture instead of letting it speak in vain, and will act so that the Holy Spirit may have His way within, God will give even “a greater grace,” namely, all that follows from humbleness and from turning away from the world. See benefit, bounty, liberality, thank.

Note: The corresponding verb charitoo, “to endue with divine favor or grace,” is used in Luke 1:28, “highly favored” (marg., “endued with grace”) and Eph. 1:6, kjv, “hath made … accepted”; rv, “freely bestowed” (marg., “endued.”).

2. euprepeia (εὐπρέπεια, 2143), “comeliness, goodly appearance,” is said of the outward appearance of the flower of the grass, Jas. 1:11.¶ [2]

 

 
 
 


[1]Youngblood, R. F., Bruce, F. F., Harrison, R. K., & Thomas Nelson Publishers. (1995). Nelson's new illustrated Bible dictionary. Rev. ed. of: Nelson's illustrated Bible dictionary.; Includes index. Nashville: T. Nelson.

¶ Indicates that all the NT occurrences of the Greek word under con...ation are mentioned under the heading or sub-heading.

[2]Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W. (1996). Vine's complete expository dictionary of Old and New Testament words (2:277). Nashville: T. Nelson.

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